Pets At Their Best

Premier Pet Health Plan: A health plan from Withy Grove Vets

We are pleased to announce that we have relaunched our Premier Pet Health Plan. This plan allows you to spread the cost of your pet’s preventative treatments over the year, automatically earning discount on these products and services as well as all the other services provided by the practice.

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We want your pet to keep living life to their best and by giving them maximum protection we take care of all the essential vaccinations, flea and worm treatments and regular health checks.

Preventative health care plans are different from insurance, we recommend all pets are insured, the Preventative Health Plan provides discount from the products not covered by insurance as well as keeping your pet as healthy as possible.

The plans are specific to the different sizes of dog, to cats and to rabbits. Each plan contains the best products, giving your pet protection against ALL the parasites and preventable diseases that we can. Some flea treatments, for example, don’t cover ticks as well, and not all worming treatments cover all the worms. However, our plan gives you products that cover it all, ‘gold standard’ if you like.

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For example, the dog plans cover the annual vaccination and health check, including kennel cough, 12 months flea, worm and tick cover, 4 free consultations with our nurses a year, a six month health check with the vet and 10% from all our other practice consultations, surgical operations, X rays etc as well as drug and diet sales.

See the example below for a medium sized dog, saving you £117 a year plus 10% off other practice visits.

Please ask a member of our team for further details

MEDIUM DOG (10-20kg as an adult)

Gold standard plan to now include Kennel Cough and Lungworm prevention.

Pay as you goPet Care Plan
Total£297.06£180.00
Health check & annual vaccination£24.95Included
Kennel cough vaccine£24.95Included
Six month health check£23.96Included
A year’s supply of prescription strength£102.96Included
worm control£67.44Included
Nurse clinics x 4 per year£52.80Included

PLUS

Plus 10% Discount Off Everything

Costing only £15.00 per month

additional £5.00 one-off set-up fee taken with first Direct Debit

Saving you up to £117.06 per year

More Views Down Our Microscope

Here are a few more views taken by Matt down our practice microscope

‘Walking Dandruff’ mites

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These little mites, which are just visible to the human eye, are also known as Cheyletiella. They are usually very itchy and produce a lot of dandruff from the irritated skin, hence the name. They are highly contagious and affect cats, dogs and rabbits. We can test for them very easily by taking a sticky tape impression from the animal’s skin and looking at it under the microscope. In rabbits they produce a thick dandruff and scale particularly on the back between the shoulder blades. They can bite humans too but can’t live on us so when they are killed on your pet (and they are usually fairly easy for us to eliminate) any itchy spots on you should go too!

Ear bacteria and wax

ear-swab-vet-preston We will often take ear swabs to be sent to an external laboratory to be cultured and give us  an idea of what antibiotic to use. However, we can get a lot of information from doing an ‘in house’ swab which we stain and look at giving you the results on the same day. This will give us an idea of if there are any ear mites, yeasts and different types of bacteria in the ear. This in turn gives us an idea what is the best ear drop to use and more importantly what type of ear cleaner to use. There are many different types of ear cleaner (as you’ve probably noticed) and  they all do different things. Some just clean the ear but others can help destroy bacteria or yeasts. If we swab your pets ear we can phone you later the same day to advise what is the best type of drop and cleaner to use.

Fleas

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Much has been written about fleas, but they do make good photos! Click here to read more on flea control at Withy Grove.

Bladder Crystals

Animals will sometimes produce crystals in the urine which cause cystitis from irritation as well as being able to ‘grow’ into bladder stones. We can identify what type they are (these ones are called struvite) and this gives us an idea of how to both prevent and treat them.

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Should you get your bitch spayed?

Here’s what you need to know about neutering your bitch.

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A bitch spay is a hysterectomy, removing ovaries and uterus under general anaesthesia. It can be performed at any age but is safer in young, thin and fit animals.

Advantages

  • Prevention of coming into season A season is messy, and attracts male dogs which can be inconvenient!
  • Pregnancy prevention – There are already too many strays, but if you wish to breed from your bitch, you should seek veterinary advice. Some breeds are more likely to have problems requiring a Caesarian Section . A bitch does not need to have a litter, she will be just as happy without one.
  • Prevention of Pyometra (womb infection) which can be fatal in older bitches.
  • Prevention of false pregnancy which can make bitches ill after a season.
  • Prevention of ovarian and uterine cancer.
  • Prevents mammary cancers (the commonest canine cancer), the risk is decreased the younger spaying is done.
  • Helps manage epilepsy and diabetes.

Disadvantages

  • Obesity
    This can occur after the operation, but ONLY if the dog is fed too much for her exercise. Spaying makes this more obvious but does NOT cause obesity. Dietary advice is free of charge from this practice and we send a reminder for a FREE weight check three months after the operation so we can check weight and give advice.
  • Incontinence
    Spaying does slightly increase the risk of urinary incontinence, however, non- spayed bitches may become incontinent as they get older (2% do). There is no evidence that timing of spaying affects whether incontinence occurs. Incontinence in older bitches is complicated, factors involved include;
  • Breed
  • Obesity
  • Hormones
  • Bladder position and other internal factors.

Timing

Spaying before the first season is easier, safer and gives maximum prevention of mammary cancer. Early neutering doesn’t harm a bitch’s later health or development. Having a litter makes NO difference to a bitch’s subsequent development.

We prefer to spay bitches either before their first season or midway between two seasons, because blood supply to the womb is then less making surgery safer.

Alternatives

There is an injection that stops a bitch coming into season.

Accidental pregnancy (misalliance)

If your bitch gets pregnant by accident, there is an injection that will stop the pregnancy. Also, in early pregnancy spaying can still be done to terminate the pregnancy.

Having your bitch spayed is a big decision. Please don’t hesitate to contact a member of the Withy Grove team and we will gladly advise you.

What is Demodex mange?

Demodex or demodicosis is a mange mite which usually infects young puppies, but can be found in any age dog and also in cats. It is a ‘cigar shaped’ mite which burrows into the hair follicles where it spends its life.

Puppies

Most adult dogs carry a few demodex mites, but when bitches are pregnant the mites become activated and, although the bitch may not show any signs, they migrate onto the puppies where they can cause bald patches and itching. These patches are usually around the head and front legs as these are the areas that come into closest contact with the bitch when the puppies are suckling.

In some puppies the patches will spontaneously get better as the puppy gets older but they can also get worse and get infected which makes them very uncomfortable.

Adults and Cats

Infection in adult dogs and cats can cause itching and infection anywhere on the body but particularly in the feet. They can be a reason why an apparently simple looking infection fails to respond to treatment. The mites are not infectious for humans.

Diagnosis

This is usually by doing a skin scrape where we scrape the top layer of skin with a scalpel blade and look for the mites under the microscope. At Withy Grove we have invested in a new camera for our microscope and can now take good photographs down it. Below is a photograph we have taken of demodex mites taken recently from an infected pet in the clinic. For deep infections sometimes a full skin biopsy is needed to get a diagnosis as the mites can be difficult to see in a skin scrape.

Treatment

In days gone by the treatments we had were few and messy but modern medicine means we can now treat this condition easily with a ‘spot on’ or pill preparation.

As always, if you have any questions about demodicosis or its treatment, please ask one of our team or e mail us on info@withygrovevets.co.uk.

Love Your Pet, Dog Biscuits and Staff Exams!

Two dates for your diary later this month. The first is Love Your Pet Day which is held every year on 20th February. This is the day to spoil your pet be it cat, dog, rabbit, guinea pig, bird, tortoise or anything else! This day was set aside to help us appreciate our furry, or not so furry, friends. So remember on Monday February the 20th to give your pet an extra cuddle or treat.

Waiting to be appreciated.

Waiting to be appreciated.

Following quickly on the heels of this is International Dog Biscuit Appreciation Day. Yes! there is a day to celebrate this on 23rd February. Dog biscuits were ‘invented’ in the mid 19th century when an American manufacturer, James Spratt came to England and visited Liverpool. Here he saw stray dogs eating ship’s biscuits on the quayside. He came up with the idea of a specific dog biscuit, called ‘Spratts Biscuits’ initially made in London using a secret recipe including both meat and vegetables. As the years have gone by biscuits for dogs have been subjected to massive amounts of research to make the wide choice of  palatable, healthy biscuits and treats we have today. So celebrate, get your dog an extra treat on 23rd February, and don’t forget the cats!

Waiting for a biscuit.

Waiting for a biscuit.

On a slightly more serious note, three of the Withy Grove Team will be taking important exams this spring. Beki and Olwyn are sitting exams for the Animal Nursing Assistant (ANA) exam. This is a useful course on its own but it can also be used as a stepping stone to taking the full Veterinary Nurse (VN) qualification. Suanne will be sitting the final exam of her Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) Certificate of Advanced Veterinary Practice (AVP) which will qualify her to be an Advanced Practitioner in surgery. On top of this we have two Veterinary Nursing Students doing their placements with us, Charlotte and Emma who you may well meet on your visits to the surgery.

February is National Pet Dental Health Month!

February is National Pet Dental Health Month (NPDHM). We should be looking after our pet’s dental health as well as we do our own all the time but February is a time to take stock and make sure we are doing the best we can. It is estimated that up to 80% of cats and dogs over the age of 3 have some form of dental disease. This is due to many factors, lack of tooth cleaning, diet, treats and shape of the mouth are some of them.

We can scale and polish teeth, removing any diseased ones.

We can scale and polish teeth, removing any diseased ones.

Pets mouths suffer from the same problems as our own, and regular cleaning is essential to keep the gums and teeth healthy. This will avoid pain, smelly breath and eating problems but also poor mouth hygiene can allow bacteria to get into the blood stream and these can settle out in other organs and cause problems, some of which can be quite serious. For instance, bacteria from dental disease can cause heart and lung problems as well as kidney infection.

Tooth brushing is the best way to keep on top of your pet’s teeth, but it isn’t always easy and if your pet resents it a lot it can cause stress to both you and your cat or dog. There are many other clever ways of helping, most are not as good as brushing but they all help. So there are tooth cleaning biscuits such as Hills T/D, chews and mouth washes, also a solution you add to your pet’s water and various gels which act as a mouth disinfectant. The important thing is to find a combination that you and your pet find easy to do and which is also effective.

Don’t forget rabbits, guinea pigs and other species can also get dental problem.

Free Dental Health Check Up!

Here at Withy Grove we have always offered a FREE dental check up where we can examine your pet’s mouth and talk about ways to keep it clean. You can take advantage of this complimentary service at any time but February is a good time to assess what you are doing. If you would like to make an appointment you can do so here, or give us a ring on 01772 330103. We also have a page on our website discussing Dental care in more detail, you can access it here.

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